Choose to be Curious, Life Lessons

Cultivating Cultural Intelligence

“When we become curious about something, we are choosing to let go of everything we know, to drop everything we know, and just plunge. ” ~ Asma Ahmad

Cultural intelligence is the capability to relate and work effectively across cultures. Its cultivation calls upon many aspects of curiosity: empathy, adaptability, and a tolerance for ambiguity.

Asma Ahmad is the visionary and driving force behind the social enterprise start up, Zaha, an immersive cultural experience that provides opportunities to connect and engage with people from other cultures, through co-created food experiences and storytelling.

She offers us a path to greater cultural intelligence.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #98: Cultivating Cultural Intelligence, with Asma Ahmad

As you go through the week, how might you cultivate your cultural intelligence and reveal some more of your intangible heritage to someone else?

Check out Zaha Experience.  

More on cultural intelligence from Forbes, Harvard Business Review, and the Cultural Intelligence Center.  

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”“The Shoes They Wear” by Delray, from Blue Dot Sessions.

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

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*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

gratitude - empathy

 

Choose to be Curious, Life Lessons

Curiosity, Values and Financial Planning

“I want people to be curious about the alternatives that are available to them.” ~ Rebecca Borton

This week we meet at the intersection of Money and What Matters.

Rebecca Borton is Associate Client Advisor at Concentric Private Wealth. She and her colleagues provide independent wealth management and financial planning services with a focus on behavioral advice. Research shows curiosity leads us to generate alternatives. Rebecca and I consider how choosing to be curious about what matters most to us might actually help us plan more effectively.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #97: Curiosity, Values and Financial Planning, with Rebecca Borton.

More about Rebecca Borton’s work and her interview with WERA’s Yasmine Arrington on Millennial Minds. 

Francesca Gino’s research is featured in this three-part Harvard Business Review cover feature on curiosity. 

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”. “One Little Triumph” by Piano Mover at Blue Dot Sessions.

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Mary Karr: If You Can Get Curious - #curiosity quotes

 

 

Choose to be Curious

Designing for Curiosity

“We use curiosity as a medium, to study how to make people think. ” ~ HyunJoo Oh

Some time ago I came across an article about a new class at Georgia Tech called  Designing for Curiosity, The class was the brainchild of HyunJoo Oh, who has a joint appointment in the School of Industrial Design and School of Interactive Computing. HyunJoo challenged her students to apply the theories of design to the reality of kids — the world’s toughest audience.

So what did that all look like? What did they learn along the way?  And what might the rest of us draw from their experience?

Listen to Choose to be Curious #94: Designing for Curiosity, with HyunJoo Oh

Machines from paper! More about HyunJoo Oh and her Designing for Curiosity class. 

“All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Designing for Homo Ludens, by Bill Gaver.

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”. “Cradle Rock” by Nursery at Blue Dot Sessions.

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

If you were designing for curiosity. how would you measure your success?-2

Choose to be Curious

Curios & Curiotizing

This week we returned to considering how curiosity is politicized, often expressed in ways that dehumanize the people at whom is it directed — sometimes intentionally, sometimes not, but almost inevitably with further-reaching consequences than we might like to imagine.

And, then: what does it look like to push back against that tendency — in ourselves, in our popular media, in academic journals? Amy Marvin tells a cautionary tale of misdirected curiosity’s risks for trans people and takes on the consequences of people being reduced to curios.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #93: Curios & Curiotizing, with Amy Marvin

What I Learned: I had not realized what a commercial industry has arisen among journalist and academics in making a “study” of trans people. It is a useful reminder that “paying attention” can take many forms, not all of them good.

What I Loved: Much like the movement to be intentionally anti-racist, Amy advocates for anti-curiotizing. She makes a case for purposeful efforts to counter the economic and other interests that contribute to the dehumanizing effects of turning real people into curios — and engaging curiosity in caring ways that yield “more complicated and nuanced areas of study.” That, and her encouragement to bring humor to our own self  discovery.

Want to keep learning? Amy recommends reading more. Start here:

Amy Marvin is the fifth in my series of interviews with the contributing authors to the forthcoming anthology Curiosity Studies: A New Ecology of Knowledge (University of Minnesota Press, 2020).  Stay tuned for future episodes!

You can follow Amy Marvin on Twitter at @amyrmarv

Many thanks to London-based audio producer Arlie Adlington for sharing his work, “The toilets at home are all gender neutral.”

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Marvin - I'm interested in how curiosity can trap you behind that glass and really limit how you are looked at. ~ Amy Marvin

Choose to be Curious

Upcycling

Today, Choose to be Curious meets some makers, with a little help from Henry Dunbar and The Shop at Arlington Central Library.

By day, Henry is director of Arlington’s active transportation programs, including BikeArlington, WalkArlington and Capital Bikeshare.  Around the edges of those days, he looks around and wonders, “What can I do with that…?”

Listen to Choose to be Curious #92: On Being a Curious Maker, with Henry Dunbar

This is our Fall Fund Drive and we could use your support. Please consider making a tax-deductible contribute to Arlington Independent Media / WERA today. Thanks!

Check out Henry’s passions: BikeArlington, WalkArlington, Capital Bikeshare &  Phoenix Bikes.

Got itchy creative fingers? Visit The Shop.

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Thoreau - The question is not what you look at, but what you see

Choose to be Curious

Curiosity & Philanthropy

“Philanthropy has both the opportunity and the responsibility to say, ‘Step back. What would you try if you had the opportunity to try something different that might — or might not — make a change. And if it doesn’t, we’ll try something different next time…'” ~ Sonia Quiñónez

It’s the annual Fall Fund Drive here at Arlington Independent Media, so perhaps it is natural that my thoughts should turn to philanthropy and charitable giving.

How do decisions get made in philanthropy? Who decides what gets supported? How do we know what’s needed, or what works? How do we know we’re not throwing good money after bad?

And, of course: how does — or might —  curiosity shape philanthropy?

Sonia Quiñónez is the Northern Virginia Program Director at the Meyer Foundation. She joined me to explore the importance of curiosity, surprise and risk-taking in the strategic choices that funders make.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #91: Curiosity & Philanthropy with Sonia Quiñónez.

 

Visit the Meyer Foundation.

Jim Ryan’s “five essential questions” beginning with “Wait, what?”

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Wait, what?,

Choose to be Curious

Storytelling: A Curious Tale

“I think through the narrative: Did I answer those questions to begin with? Was there a better way that I could answer those questions? Was there a way I could be more articulate in a way that they don’t have those questions anymore? I think that’s where curiosity helps to build the story.” ~ Ronald Young, Jr.

I come from a long line of storytellers. I love a good story and I’ve been trying to parse what it is about stories – and storytelling – that we enjoy so much.

No surprise, I suppose, but I think it has a lot to do with curiosity.  I think stories pique curiosity. They foster curiosity.

Indeed, stories rely on curiosity.

Ronald Young, Jr. is a podcaster and gifted personal narrative storyteller. He has some things to say about curiosity’s contribution to his craft.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #90: Storytelling: A Curious Tale, with Ronald Young, Jr.

Listening to the conversation with Ronald for about the 5th time (one can never listen too much!) two insights jumped out at me that illuminate the inspiration for this episode.

Others’ curiosity helps us tell our own stories. Perhaps this seems obvious, but I think it’s rather profound: the shape and color we give to our own lives depends, at least in part, on the attention and imagination of others. By listening attentively, they help us attend to our own tales. Others can help us see and share ourselves more fully — especially if they choose to be curious about us and the stories we might have to tell.

Good stories – the ones that really captivate us – draw on all the dimensions of human curiosity.  Rather than worry about whether it’s a state or trait, psychologist and George Mason University professor Todd Kashdan sees curiosity as a multidimensional mode that finds unique combinations and expressions in each of us. A good story seems to draw on all those dimensions, appealing to each of us for different reasons, tickling points all along curiosity’s full expressive spectrum.

Check out Ronald’s Time Well Spent podcast and join me for his live event on October 4, 2019, in Alexandria, VA. Tickets available here.  “Bypass” clip used with permission.

Enjoy stories from DC’s own StoryDistrict at StoryDistrictPresents.

Check out a quick summary of Uri Hasson’s work on the human communication systems in effective storytelling and Todd Kashdan’s five dimensions of curiosity.

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

RBSH - story2