Choose to be Curious, Life Lessons

Voicing Curiosity

“The way that we know that curiosity is genuine in somebody’s voice is that they have tapped into this real desire, this real drive, this real motivation.” ~ Carol Cadby

How we say anything, how we punctuate our statements grammatically and verbally, all have tremendous impact on how we are heard and understood.

So how do we say something in such a way that others hear curiosity? Actor, director, educator and executive coach Carol Cadby joins me to explore voicing curiosity.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #116: Voicing Curiosity, with Carol Cadby

Our motto at Arlington Independent Media is “Raise Your Voice.” If you have a story you want to tell or share, want to learn how to use media to do that, we’re here for you. This is our spring fund drive. We’d love your support. Help us help you and others to raise your voices, to hear and be heard. Donations much appreciated at wera.fm .

Learn more and connect with Carol via OLA Consulting

Listen to what Erin Foreman-Murray has to say about dance and embodied curiosity. 

Our theme and other music is by Sean Balick . “Great Great Lengths” by The Ballonist, via Blue Dot Sessions.

EDITOR PICK LOCAL PODCASTYou can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shopAll purchases support Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Hear & Be Heard

 

Back Story, Choose to be Curious, Life Lessons, Making a List, UnComfort Zone

Hello, Dear Curious Friends

Hello Dear ListenersHello, friends, how are you?

I wanted to check in and say hi. Things are about to change for all of us, in ways I’m not sure we’ve really yet fully imagined, and I wanted to just connect and say thank you. 

Thank you for joining me on this curiosity journey. Thank you for showing up for life and work in curious and attentive ways. Thank you for taking care of yourself and everyone around you right now. Thank you for being you!

My dear buddy Mo, my conscience from afar, wrote to me the other night, “Curious to learn in what ways you’ll be reaching out to your listeners. We postponed the local service jam.”

The truth is, I’ve been so consumed with concerns about Arlington Independent Media‘s fate in the throes of all that is going on, that I haven’t been thinking much about my own show. I’ve come racing up against production deadlines, hastily typing blog posts, forgoing much of what is delightful in the craft, and just moving on.

But we’re not moving around much any more, most of us. Nor will we be.

So here’s what I can say for now:

I’m going to keep looking for these curiosity conversations and sharing them with you. You may notice some shifts in audio quality. I’m trying to find the best ways to deliver good content and sound from my basement, but it’s not going to compare with what I was able to produce at AIM. Bear with me!

Our new normal is both an obstacle and an opportunity. The obstacles are obvious; it’s the opportunities that interest me. What new habits can we cultivate that bring us closer, even as we maintain safe distances? How can we meaningfully enlarge our world, even as it temporarily shrinks? Time for that classic curiosity refrain: How might we….?

“I’m in the mood to try stuff!” is how one of my intrepid AIM partners has approached our challenges there. I’m inclined to adopt that spirit as well. Here’s some of the stuff I want to try….

      1. Breakfast with Friends: I’m going to miss meeting friends for breakfast, so I’m going to try to do that virtually. A friend who has a communications firm in Baltimore joins his staff each morning for virtual coffee. I don’t like coffee, but I love the idea. (Also: I sent a gift card for “our” breakfast spot to one friend, a promissory note to pick up where we’ve left off and a small way to support local businesses.)
      2. Curiosity Walks: Time to rediscover what’s within my four walls, to stroll the floorboards with as much attention to the textures, shadows and hidden delights as I would along the boulevards and byways of any other destination. I began in my kitchen some time ago. It was a lot of fun.
      3. Read Harder: Inspired by Dani Bassett’s “inter-book quotation network”  and Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge, I’ll read outside the familiar, let my curiosity take me to unexpected places and to mingle with a whole new crowd. Might even go shopping on my shelves. Pretty sure there are some books there I haven’t yet read….

Each week, when a new episode airs, D. and I assemble in the living room to listen. No matter how many times I’ve heard them, the shows just sound different on the radio — which never ceases to amaze me. But what I really love is that we have this date to listen together. He’s a gracious audience and a good #analogy sport. I invite you to join our virtual living room via wera.fm Wednesday mornings at 10am Eastern time.

Come, choose to be curious — and #ListenTogether.

So, I’m curious: what stuff are you trying? What opportunities are you finding? Let me know — and stay well.

p.s. The photo of me actually predates the “no hands on your face” guidance. <sigh> SO many changes. I love you.

How might I...?

 

Choose to be Curious

Curiosity & Health Advocacy

“When patients and their family members understand the why, they’re much more likely to follow through.” ~ Nicole Rochester, M.D.

Studies show that health information seeking behavior (HISB) raises individuals’ self-care management skills and medical treatment compliance, and enhances shared decision-making and medical treatment satisfaction.*

So choosing to be curious about our own health and health care options is good for us.

I know from my own experience, when health concerns get complicated – which is to say any time we’re talking about healthcare – it’s incredibly helpful to have more than one person asking questions, hearing answers, and wondering about alternatives. That might be a family member, friend, trusted community member — or a professional health advocate. Dr. Nicole Rochester, physician and founder of Your GPS Doc LLC, is such an advocate.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #109: Curiosity & Health Advocacy, with Nicole Rochester. M.D.

Check out Dr. Nicole Rochester at Your GPS Doc LLC.

*It turns out, health seeking behaviors are good for you. Take a look at the research.

EDITOR PICK LOCAL PODCASTOur theme music is by Sean Balick . Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  “Mind Body Mind” by BodyTonic, via Blue Dot Sessions.


You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Rochester - Knowledge is Power

Choose to be Curious

Greg Hamilton Just Wanted to Know Stuff

“I think the knowing is really powerful — because you stop guessing.” ~ Greg Hamilton

Many folks have interviewed Arlington Magazine founder and publisher Greg Hamilton about his community leadership and business and communications savvy. You won’t get that here today. Greg had a story he wanted to share — and far be it from me to stand in the way of a heartwarming tale of curiosity rewarded.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #108: Greg Hamilton Just Wanted to Know Stuff

Where might you be curious, unlock your imagination, and shape your future?

Greg recommends The Girls Who Went Away, by Ann Fessler.

EDITOR PICK LOCAL PODCASTCheck out Arlington Magazine — and be sure to patronize the #BestOf businesses!

Our theme music is by Sean Balick . Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  “City Limits” by Albany NY, via  Blue Dot Sessions.


You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Hawking - Remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see and wonderf about what makes the universe exist. Be curious..png

Choose to be Curious

Build a Better Shoe

“The passion probably feeds it all.” ~ Casey Kerrigan

This is a conversation about that quintessentially curious query: How might I…?

Casey Kerrigan, a Harvard-trained doctor, now calls herself a cobbler. Having established just how bad most footwear is for women, she asked herself: how might I build a better shoe? Then her interest in gait morphed into a passion for 3D printing.

You just never know where curiosity will take you.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #106: Build a Better Shoe, with Casey Kerrigan, M.D.

toasty salons
Check out OESH Shoes here.  

Curiosity and Serendipity in Qualitative Research, by O. Åkerström

Our theme and other music are thanks to Sean Balick . “Discovery Harbor” by Cloud Harbor at Blue Dot Sessions. 

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

EDITOR PICK LOCAL PODCASTCheck out the Choose to be Curious shopAll purchases support Arlington Independent Media.

Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

 

Emerson - Curiosity is lying in wait for every secret

Choose to be Curious

Why Should This Be So?

“We value knowing things, not the process of not knowing something and wanting to get the answer — and those are a world apart, those two perspectives.” ~ Susan Enge

When Charles Darwin was trying to make sense of the species he was – and was not – finding in the Galapagos Islands, he famously and repeatedly asked, “Why should this be so?”

It is a scientist’s refrain: the question one asks while testing a hypothesis — finding, perhaps, that another is needed. It is a question Susan Engel, a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Founding Director of the Program in Teaching at Williams College, asks of herself as well.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #103: Why Should This Be So? with Susan Engel

What I Learned: Adults’ responses to a child’s exploratory behavior have a big effect on how those children will explore, how long or what they’ll investigate. The very kids who might most need help from an adult to pursue their curiosity are the ones who are going to be most damaged by adults who discourage any curiosity.

What I Loved: It’s hard not to fall in love with Susan’s devotion to curiosity, learning and education, but I think what I loved most was her final bit of advice and newest curiosity practice. You’ll just have to listen to hear why! Hint: she embodies the learner ethos.

Susan Engel is the eighth in my series of interviews with the contributing authors to the forthcoming anthology Curiosity Studies: A New Ecology of Knowledge (University of Minnesota Press, 2020).  Stay tuned for future episodes!

Find more about Susan Engel’s terrific work here, here and here. Check out The Hungry Mind: The Origins of Curiosity in Childhood.

Our theme music is by Sean Balick . Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  “Curious Case” by The Cabinetmarkers, via  Blue Dot Sessions.

EDITOR PICK LOCAL PODCASTYou can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shopAll purchases support Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Engel - The world looks different when you're thinking about other people's curiosity.png

Choose to be Curious

Curiosity, Trust & Real Estate

“If you streamline the beginning, and you don’t really know what’s motivating someone, or what’s important to them, or what’s going on in their life, you could find it all goes south … because there was something you didn’t get at.” ~ Christine Hopkins

From my home to yours in this holiday season, a conversation about curiosity, trust — and real estate. Realtor Christine Hopkins shares her insights on curiosity’s role in building trust at one of life’s most intimate transactions: buying a home.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #101: Curiosity, Trust & Homebuying, with Realtor Christine Hopkins.

Christine has sponsored Choose to be Curious for most of my 101 episodes. I appreciate her support more than I can say. Find NoVa House Hunter on Facebook.  

That trust equation I mentioned? You can find more here.

Our theme music is by Sean Balick . Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”.  “Home Home At Last” by Warmbody, via  Blue Dot Sessions.

EDITOR PICK LOCAL PODCASTYou can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shopAll purchases support Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Season's Greetings

Choose to be Curious

Neurodiverse Curiosity: what if we assume everyone is equally curious?

“And so when it came to writing this curiosity paper, I thought: how would we do it? How would we take something that we barely understood in the normative sense, and study it for all of those other kids who don’t generally have a voice and don’t generally get studied?” ~ Kristy Johnson

MIT Media Lab Fellow Kristy Johnson believes we’re thinking about curiosity all wrong — and leaving out a huge swath of the human experience while we’re at it. She offers an exciting alternative: define curiosity as the ways in which an individual excels in exploring — and then go from there.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #99: Neurodiverse Curiosity, with Kristy Johnson.

What I Learned: Science has a huge arsenal to throw at curiosity, if it so chooses. Kristy and others are making use of all sorts of technologies, breaking new ground and creating cross-disciplinary approaches that will surely open new pathways to our understanding of this complex constellation of feelings and behaviors we call curiosity.

What I Loved: I found Kristy’s approach to blowing the definition of custody wide open thrilling. Whether or not you accept the premise that we’re all equally curious, the notion that we may not yet have a grip on the full spectrum of curiosity is exciting and telling. Obviously, we still have a lot to learn and there will be plenty more to talk about!

Kristy Johnson is the seventh in my series of interviews with the contributing authors to the forthcoming anthology Curiosity Studies: A New Ecology of Knowledge (University of Minnesota Press, 2020).  Stay tuned for future episodes!

Meet Kristy Johnson

Check out the exciting work being done at The Lab School and MIT Media Lab.

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Johnson - To really understand curiosity, we need new metrics

 

Choose to be Curious, Life Lessons

Cultivating Cultural Intelligence

“When we become curious about something, we are choosing to let go of everything we know, to drop everything we know, and just plunge. ” ~ Asma Ahmad

Cultural intelligence is the capability to relate and work effectively across cultures. Its cultivation calls upon many aspects of curiosity: empathy, adaptability, and a tolerance for ambiguity.

Asma Ahmad is the visionary and driving force behind the social enterprise start up, Zaha, an immersive cultural experience that provides opportunities to connect and engage with people from other cultures, through co-created food experiences and storytelling.

She offers us a path to greater cultural intelligence.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #98: Cultivating Cultural Intelligence, with Asma Ahmad

As you go through the week, how might you cultivate your cultural intelligence and reveal some more of your intangible heritage to someone else?

Check out Zaha Experience.  

More on cultural intelligence from Forbes, Harvard Business Review, and the Cultural Intelligence Center.  

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”“The Shoes They Wear” by Delray, from Blue Dot Sessions.

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

gratitude - empathy

 

Choose to be Curious, Life Lessons

Curiosity, Values and Financial Planning

“I want people to be curious about the alternatives that are available to them.” ~ Rebecca Borton

This week we meet at the intersection of Money and What Matters.

Rebecca Borton is Associate Client Advisor at Concentric Private Wealth. She and her colleagues provide independent wealth management and financial planning services with a focus on behavioral advice. Research shows curiosity leads us to generate alternatives. Rebecca and I consider how choosing to be curious about what matters most to us might actually help us plan more effectively.

Listen to Choose to be Curious #97: Curiosity, Values and Financial Planning, with Rebecca Borton.

More about Rebecca Borton’s work and her interview with WERA’s Yasmine Arrington on Millennial Minds. 

Francesca Gino’s research is featured in this three-part Harvard Business Review cover feature on curiosity. 

Theme music by Sean Balick.  Check out Sean’s new album “From the Pines”. “One Little Triumph” by Piano Mover at Blue Dot Sessions.

You can subscribe to Choose to be Curious on Apple Podcasts/ iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Choose to be Curious shop!*

*Any purchase from the Choose to be Curious shop supports Arlington Independent Media. Please also consider making a donation at wera.fm. Thanks!

Mary Karr: If You Can Get Curious - #curiosity quotes